Tagged: brush b gon

Concentrated Weed Killer Applied Precisely – the Best Way to Kill Tough Weeds

At Green Shoots, we sell concentrated weed killer and our foam herbicide dispenser systems help you
apply that weed killer precisely and with low drift.  Concentrated weed killer or herbicide is not just more economical.  It is also more effective.

Read this paper (link) from Bryan Young, currently a professor at Purdue about glyphosate rates.  In it he says: “The most consistent application factor that can increase glyphosate efficacy is lower carrier volumes.”  What does Professor Young mean by this?  He means that by adding less carrier (i.e., water) and increasing the amount of glyphosate herbicide (i.e., increasing the herbicide concentration) in the spray solution, the herbicide is more effective.  Moreover, this is the case even though an application may cover less of the target plant.

Take a look at the photos below and this video to see before and after images of weeds treated with low volume/high concentration applications: Video (link).  As you will see in the foliar applications, very small amounts of herbicide are applied to very small areas of foliage (probably covering less than 10% of the green foliage).  In spite of the small amount of coverage, the weeds were completely killed.

Concentrated Foam Herbicide Applied to Bull Thistle Rosette

Concentrated Foam Herbicide Applied to Bull Thistle Rosette

8 Days Later - Thistle Is Dead

8 Days Later – Thistle Is Dead

Weed Trees and How to Kill by the Roots using Foam Herbicide

We posted an animated video on YouTube showing how to kill a weed tree using foam herbicide.  The video also explains why foam herbicide works better than liquid herbicide for cut stump applications.

Illustration Showing Foam Herbicide Applied to Inner Bark of Stump

Illustration Showing Foam Herbicide Applied to Inner Bark of Stump

Killing Invasive Vines such as Kudzu, Oriental Bittersweet, Mile-a-Minute

Invasive vines can really take over. They primarily crowd out desirable species by shading them, but they can also girdle stems of desirable plants and cut off the free flow of plant sugars to the canopy.

To control them with herbicide, there are several things to keep in mind. First, a foliar application to vine foliage is almost always a bad idea. Usually the foliage of the vine is too intermingled with the foliage of desirable plants. Even if you can segregate the foliage of the invasive from the desirable, spraying upward where vines grow is inadvisable. You will likely end up with more spray mist on yourself than on the target vine.

Second, don’t pull the vine down from the canopy. If you do, you may do more damage to the desirable plant by breaking branches and tearing into live plant tissue (if the vine has adhesive pads that attach to stems). Focus your efforts instead on killing the vine and leaving it in place. If you want to speed its decay and to lessen strangulation of a desirable plant, cut notches into the vine stem. Again, avoid cutting the desirable plant.

Third, you will probably have better luck killing the vine if you apply the herbicide in late summer, fall, or even winter. Those are the times when the plant is translocating sugars to the roots which is also where you want the herbicide to flow.

If you want to prevent the vine from producing seeds, here is a trick that I use. After the vine has leafed out but well before it has produced fruit or seeds, cut the vine as high as you can from where it is rooted. Then allow the vine to regrow. It probably will do so vigorously with multiple new sprouts from near the cut. The trick is that you will do your treatment below this cut and new sprouts. This not only should prevent the vine from flowering and producing seeds, it will also sap the roots of energy and make the herbicide application more effective.

Applying Foam Herbicide to Cut Stump

Applying Foam Herbicide to Cut Stump

One way to apply herbicide is to use what is called a cut stump method (shown above). With this method, you cut the stem of the vine close to the ground – generally two to four inches above the ground from where the vine is rooted. (if the vine is rooted in multiple locations, you will need to cut and treat near each root clump.) Don’t cut so close to the ground that dirt gets on the cut face of the stump (dirt neutralizes herbicides such as glyphosate). But don’t cut too high because the treatment will be less effective. Then immediately treat the stump face with a concentrated foam herbicide.  Apply the foam herbicide in a ring near the outer perimeter.    You want to make sure the herbicide contacts the living plant tissue called the cambium which is just inside the outer bark. Green Shoots Foam Herbicide works great for this because you can precisely stack the foam right on the cambium and it will slowly soak in.  If you wait more than about 10 to 15 minutes after cutting the stump, I would recommend re-cutting before applying the herbicide. Plants seal off wounds surprisingly quickly and this reduces the effectiveness of the herbicide. Follow the instructions on the label for the herbicide and the dispenser.

Exposed inner bark on vine

Exposed inner bark on vine

Foam herbicide applied to exposed inner bark

Foam herbicide applied to exposed inner bark

Another method is a frill treatment. With this method, you scrape or cut away some of the outer bark to expose live, inner bark as shown in the photos above. This method work especially well if the vine stem is horizontal because it provides a better surface on which to apply the herbicide. If you can try to remove bark from around the perimeter of the stem.  Again, Green Shoots Foam Herbicide works great for this because the foam will cling to the frilled tissue.  (Liquid herbicides on the other hand will drip right off.)

Be sure not to get herbicide on desirable plants. I even avoid getting herbicide on the outer bark of desirable plants. Although you may read that water-based herbicides won’t penetrate the protective, waxy layers of cork, it makes sense not to risk harm.

Targeted Weed Killer

View this PowerPoint presentation: Targeted Weed Killer: Precision Foam Herbicide Delivery System.  It explains the advantage of using foam herbicide:  less risk to desirable plants because of reduced drift or overspray ; an increase in herbicide uptake because the foam keeps the herbicide in contact with foliage longer; improved visibility because foam is easier to see than liquid; and reduced herbicide waste because the precision reduces waste.  We offer six different before-and-after examples such as the one shown in the following photos:

Application of Foam Herbicide to Bull Thistle Rosette

Application of Foam Herbicide to Bull Thistle Rosette

Dead Bull Thistle 8 Day after Foam Herbicide Application

Dead Bull Thistle 8 Day after Foam Herbicide Application

Note this: in this application, the chemical used was glyphosate which is a non-selective herbicide.  If that herbicide had contacted the grass, it would have killed the grass too.  As shown in the photos, that didn’t happen.  This is a testament to just how precise you can be with the Green Shoots System. z

Stump Killer – Use It this Winter and Get a Jump on Spring and Remove Unwanted Trees and Bushes

You have an unwanted tree growing vigorously in the wrong place – in the middle of a flower bed or in a native grass planting or next to a building foundation.  You know you need to remove it.  Winter is actually a great time of year to do this.  Herbicides work fine in the winter if applied correctly.  See Reinartz 2002.

If you simply cut the tree or bush down, you will soon get something far worse in the spring: a multi-stemmed bush like the one shown below on the right side.

Buckthorn stump with re-sprouts

treated, dead stump on left; untreated, live stump on right which is sprouting vigorously

There is a simple way to prevent this from happening: use the Green Shoots Foam Herbicide System to precisely apply a concentrated herbicide to the stump immediately after cutting to kill the stump.  So here is what you do.

  1. Cut back the tree or bush – If it is a big tree or bush, I typically cut off the upper branches first and leave a tall stump anywhere from knee to shoulder height.  Clear out the branches so you have room to work.
  2. Prepare the Foam Herbicide Dispenser according to the instructions.  Be sure to read the herbicide label.
  3. Cut the stump close to the ground – try to cut it within 2 to 4 inches of ground level.
  4. Immediately apply the foam herbicide to the cambium layer of the stump.  This is a thin layer of live inner bark  just inside the outer bark.
Freshly cut stump of weed tree

Freshly cut stump of weed tree

Foam herbicide applied to cut stump in winter

Foam herbicide applied to cut stump

The Green Shoots Foam Herbicide System has several advantages over standard herbicide sprays:

  1. Precision – This is critical when you are applying to the narrow ring of live inner bark less than 1/10 inch thick. With a liquid spray, the application is so imprecise – you may miss your target.  At the very least, you will waste herbicide trying to hit the target.
  2. Less Drip – The foam herbicide sticks to the target and will slowly soak in.  Liquid sprays will bead and drip off the target.
  3. Visibility – the foam is visible for some time after the application.  This helps in identifying what part of the target you have treated.

For more information about the Green Shoots Foam Herbicide System, visit the Green Shoots website.

New Large Handheld Foam Herbicide Dispenser – Launches in March, 2014

Large Handheld with Foliar Nozzle

Large Handheld with Foliar Nozzle

The new Large Handheld Foam Herbicide Dispenser from Green Shoots will launch in March, 2014. Two nozzles will be available: the foliar nozzle works especially well for foliar applications of foam herbicide to woody plants. the extension nozzle works well for spot treatments such as cut stump treatments. Here is a You Tube video of the Large Handheld being used for a stump treatment using triclopyr herbicide (Dowagro trade name: Garlon 3A; it is also sold under the Ortho trade name Brush-B-Gon).  Triclopyr is often used for woody brush.  Note in the video how precise the application with no drippage and full absorption into the stump face.  The extension nozzle is approximately 15 inches long so it gives you great reach.  That means less bending and stooping.  If you are doing more than a couple hours of stump applications, that means a lot!

Autumn – a Great Time of Year to Apply Herbicide to Kill Perennial Weeds or Invasive Plants

I remind people every year that fall is a great time to apply herbicides to kill perennial invasive plants. I discussed autumn herbicide applications in a post last year.  So, get out and enjoy that cooler weather and, for those of us farther north, beautiful fall colors!

In terms of priority, I would put perennial weeds into three groups: First are the perennials that need to be treated before a frost.  Plants such as Japanese knotweed quickly die back after a frost.  Therefore they need to be treated in early fall.

Second are the plants such as perennial thistles.  Canada thistle is a prime target.  Canada thistle can be treated a little later in the fall because it is more frost tolerant.  In fact, this frost tolerance can be used to your advantage.  If nearby desirable plants have lost their leaves, you can apply herbicide to the thistle with less potential for damage to the desirable plants.  Just make sure you apply the herbicide to foliage that is still green.

Third are the woody perennial weeds.  These can be treated from the fall into late winter (just do it before warm temperatures start pushing plant sugars up to the branches for leaf out).  The application should be into the vascular system of the tree or shrub, e.g., cut stump, frill, or injection.  The Directions for the Green Shoots Foam Herbicide System show how to do these applications.